People


Director
John F. Dovidio's picture John F. Dovidio, Ph.D.
Kirtland 307B
john.dovidio@yale.edu
Website

John F. Dovidio, Ph.D. is the Carl Iver Hovland Professor of Psychology and Public Health at Yale University, and the director of the Intergroup Relations Lab. His work centers around issues of social power and social relations, both between groups and between individuals. He explores both conscious (explicit) and unconscious (implicit) influences on how people think about, feel about, and behave toward others based on group membership. He continues to conduct research on aversive racism, a contemporary subtle form of prejudice, and on techniques for reducing conscious and unconscious biases. His research further explores how the bias of health care providers and perceptions by members of traditionally disadvantaged groups of being stigmatized affects medical interactions, decisions, and outcomes.

Graduate Students
Katie Duchscherer's picture Katie Duchscherer
Dunham 328A
katie.duchscherer@yale.edu
CV

Katie Duchscherer is a fifth-year Ph.D. student. Before beginning her studies at the Intergroup Lab, she received her BA in psychology from Stanford University. In general, Katie is interested in the processes behind stereotyping and identity formation, and features of online interaction that promote prosocial behavior and community formation. She is currently researching the effects of self-expressive and persistent pseudonyms, compared to anonymity, on helping behavior and norm enforcement in online forum interactions. She is also investigating the moderating effects of group identity, social context, and personality differences on these behavioral outcomes.

Bennett Callaghan's picture Bennett Callaghan
Dunham 328A
bennett.callaghan@yale.edu
Website
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Bennett Callaghan is a member of the Yale Intergroup Relations and Connecticut Social Interaction labs. His research interests broadly relate to the psychology of social class, both in terms of how it is experienced (on a personal and cultural level) and how it is implicated in collective and inter-group processes. Some research investigates how class influences people’s responses to political messages or candidates. Other research investigates how individuals communicate and perceive signals of social class or social status and how such signals influence other’s behavior. Bennett received his BA in Forensic Psychology, with a minor in English, at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (City University of New York) and spent two years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before coming to Yale.

Natalie Wittlin's picture Natalie Wittlin, MS, MPhil
Dunham 328A
natalie.wittlin@yale.edu
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Natalie Markowitz Wittlin is a sixth-year doctoral candidate whose research explores beliefs about gender and sexual orientation, as well as how those beliefs relate to physical and mental health outcomes. She is particularly interested in appearance-related stereotypes of transgender and cisgender women and men. In one line of work, she explores categorization and misgendering of transgender individuals. In another, she examines how cisgender women respond to challenges to their physical femininity. Natalie earned her B. A. from Barnard College at Columbia University with a major in psychology and a minor in political science. Prior to beginning graduate school, she worked in the fields of education, public health, and psychology.

Julian Rucker's picture Julian Rucker
Dunham 328D
julian.rucker@yale.edu
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Julian Rucker is a second-year doctoral student. He is broadly interested in investigating the psychological factors shaping perceptions of, reactions to and motivations to address intergroup inequality across a number of societal domains (e.g., criminal justice, education, health). For example, one of his main lines of research examines how lay beliefs about the interpersonal or structural nature of racism shape subsequent responses, after exposure to racial disparities in the U.S. Criminal Justice System. Before coming to Yale, Julian received a BA in Psychology, with a minor in Sociology, at The University of Texas at Austin and received a MA in Psychology from Northwestern University.

Natalie Daumeyer's picture Natalie Daumeyer
Dunham 328D
natalie.daumeyer@yale.edu
Website
CV

Natalie is a fourth year graduate student at Yale. She graduated in 2014 from Miami University with a B.A. in Psychology and a B.A. in Individualized Studies with a focus in Social Justice Issues: Power and Privilege in Society. More recently, she received a M.A. in Psychology at Northwestern, before moving to Yale with her primary advisor, Jennifer Richeson. Her research interests include stereotyping, prejudice, intersectionality, and intergroup relations. Particularly, Natalie is interested in exploring ways in which attributing discrimination to implicit compared to explicit bias influences how people make sense of the discrimination, with specific regard to accountability and support for punishment and reform.

Xanni Brown's picture Xanni Brown
xanni.brown@yale.edu

Xanni is a second year doctoral student in the social psychology program. She majored in social studies at Harvard University, where she also worked in the Sidanius intergroup psychology lab. Xanni’s research interests include intergroup relations, inequality, empathy, and political psychology, with a current focus on the political and social implications of threat over changing racial demographics. Her non-research interests include campaign finance reform, mountains, and rugby.

Lab Affiliates
Hyeyoung Shin's picture Hyeyoung Shin, Ph.D.
hyeyoung.shin@yale.edu

Hyeyoung Shin is a Research Associate at the Yale Intergroup Relations Lab. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Maryland College Park. Her research integrates social psychology and cross-cultural psychology focusing on intergroup prejudice. She investigates why people have prejudice and how the processes that underlie these biases differ between countries and cultures. She examined cultural differences between Northern European-heritage and East Asian cultures in stigmatization of non-normative groups, the role of economic competitiveness in prejudice toward immigrants and foreign workers, and social and biological intergroup hierarchy beliefs. She also examined country-specific prejudice toward immigrants and foreign workers in the US, Germany, and Australia. Her goal is to illuminate general and culture-specific processes in prejudice and intergroup relations and to develop theory-based interventions to reduce prejudice.