People


Postdocs
Oriana Aragón, Ph.D.
Dunham 340D
oriana.aragon@yale.edu
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Oriana Aragón is a postdoctoral associate working with John Dovidio studying how experiences as postdoctoral scholars might benefit from mentoring, and additionally how those benefits might deferentially impact the experiences of underrepresented individuals such as women, reentry students, and people of color.

Sara Burke
Dunham 322C
sara.burke@yale.edu
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Sara Burke is a postdoctoral researcher in social psychology. Her research explores variations in the way prejudice operates when it targets different groups, and one of her central goals is expanding the body of information about intergroup bias to better account for underexamined targets of prejudice. In one line of work, for example, she examines attitudes toward bisexual people, biracial people, and other groups perceived to fall in between more recognized social groups.

Sarah K. Calabrese, Ph.D.
135 College St, Suite 358
sarah.calabrese@yale.edu
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Sarah K. Calabrese, Ph.D., is an associate research scientist in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Division of the Yale School of Public Health. She earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from George Washington University (Washington, DC). Broadly speaking, Sarah’s research focuses on racial stereotypes and discrimination in the context of HIV prevention, sexual wellbeing, and mental health. She has particular interest in addressing barriers to the prescription and utilization of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), with the goal of ensuring equitable access across social lines.

Peng Wang, Ph.D.
60 College St, New Haven, CT 06510-3210
katie.wang@yale.edu
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Katie Wang, Ph.D., is an Associate Research Scientist at the Yale School of Public Health. Broadly speaking, Katie is interested in understanding the experience of stigmatization from the targets’ perspective. In one line of research conducted in collaboration with Dr. Jack Dovidio, Katie draws upon the theoretical frameworks of social identity and collective action to understand how women and people with disabilities perceive and respond to prejudice and discrimination. In a more recent program of research, Katie works with Dr. John Pachankis at the Yale School of Public Health to examine the role of stigma as a risk factor for adverse mental and behavioral health outcomes, both among sexual minority individuals and people diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. Moving forward, Katie is passionate about identifying coping and emotion regulation resources that can alleviate the adverse impact of stigma on health and seeks to develop brief, accessible stigma coping interventions that target these sources of resilience.

Graduate Students
April Bailey
Dunham 328D
april.bailey@yale.edu
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April Bailey is a third-year doctoral student. She is broadly interested in how people process gender information and integrate it with contexts and with other cues. In one line of work, she focuses on the interplay between gender and nonverbal displays. Her work uses behavioral and electrophysiological measures to assess which cue is more meaningful both during perception and enactment. She is also interested in a particular form of subtle bias concerning the type of person that emerges as representative of ostensibly demographic-neutral categories. Particularly, she is interested in androcentrism, whereby men are viewed as being more representative than women despite equal numeric representation. April works with professors Marianne LaFrance and Jack Dovidio. Alongside a PhD is Psychology she is pursuing a Certificate in Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies. She received her BA from Colgate University, majoring in both Psychology and Women’s Studies.

Bennett Callaghan
Dunham 328A
bennett.callaghan@yale.edu
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Bennett Callaghan is a first-year doctoral student. His research interests broadly relate to the psychology of social class, both in terms of how it is experienced (on a personal and cultural level) and how it is implicated in collective and inter-group process. For example, one current line of research investigates how class influences political participation and what kind of messages appeal to those of varying class backgrounds. Another one investigates the role of social class in propensities toward—and reactions to—prosocial behaviors, and a third examines class as a status-based entity that can be signaled to, and elicit particular behaviors from, others. He received his BA in Forensic Psychology, with a minor in English, at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (City University of New York) and spent two years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before coming to Yale.
Ava Casados
Kirtland B03
ava.casados@yale.edu

Ava Casados is a third-year clinical psychology student. Her research is aimed at addressing disparities in mental health service use among adolescents and ethnic minority individuals. She is particularly interested in mental illness stigma and the relationship between culture and mental health conceptualizations. Prior to coming to Yale, she received her B.A. in Psychology and Fine Arts from the University of Southern California.

Natalie Daumeyer
Dunham 328D
natalie.daumeyer@yale.edu

Natalie is a first year graduate student at Yale. She graduated in 2014 from Miami University with a B.A. in Psychology and a B.A. in Individualized Studies with a focus in Social Justice Issues: Power and Privilege in Society. More recently she received a M.A. in Psychology at Northwestern, before moving to Yale with her primary advisor, Jennifer Richeson. Her research interests include stereotyping, prejudice, intersectionality, and intergroup relations. Particularly, Natalie is interested in exploring ways in which perpetrators of intergroup conflict reflect on the group’s wrongdoing in ways that promote or prevent reconciliation. 

Katie Duchscherer
Dunham 328D
katie.duchscherer@yale.edu
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Katie Duchscherer is a third-year PhD student. Before beginning her studies at the Intergroup Lab, she received her BA in psychology from Stanford University. In general, Katie is interested in the processes behind stereotyping and stereotype maintenance. She is currently researching how individual differences affect stereotype maintenance, as well as investigating popular lay justifications for making use of stereotypes.

Suzanne R. Horwitz
suzanne.horwitz@yale.edu
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Suzanne R. Horwitz is a 6th year doctoral student. Prior to joining the Intergroup Relations Lab, she received her BS in psychology from Tufts University, worked at the Rochester Baby Lab under Richard Aslin, and was a student in the developmental psychology program at Yale. She is broadly interested in how social group attitudes form and how these attitudes lead to biased behavior, specifically focusing on the domain of social class as test case for understanding these processes. Suzanne’s current work examines on the role of implicit wealth attitudes in regulating favoritism/discrimination toward individuals with different social class backgrounds.

Natalie Markowitz Wittlin
Dunham 328A
natalie.wittlin@yale.edu
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Natalie Markowitz Wittlin is a second-year doctoral student whose research focuses on psychological responses to members of gender minority groups.  In one line of work, for example, she employs methods from the study of gender essentialism to uncover implicit categorizations of transgender men and women.  In another, she investigates whether people who challenge widely-held assumptions about sex and gender are “dehumanized” - that is, denied traits thought to be unique to humans.  Natalie earned her B. A. from Barnard College at Columbia University with a major in psychology and a minor in political science.  Prior to beginning graduate school, she worked in the fields of education, public health, and psychology.  

Kathleen Oltman
Dunham 328B
kathleen.oltman@yale.edu

Katie Oltman is a fourth-year student, before coming to Yale she received B.A.s in Psychology and English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Katie is primarily interested in “entitativity,” the perception of the self or others as being part of a cohesive group. Her work explores which factors of a social environment predict entitativity, and how we can manipulate perceptions of entitativity to induce positive group attitudes. Her dissertation is titled: “Intergroup Entitativity: Exploring Out-group, In-Group, and Intergroup Reactions to Entitativity.”

Gina Roussos, M.S
Dunham 328A
gina.roussos@yale.edu
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Gina Roussos is a fourth-year Doctoral Candidate studying under Dr. John Dovidio in the social area and Dr. Yarrow Dunham in the developmental area. Before coming to Yale, she received her B.S in Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh. She investigates the antecedents and consequences of prejudiced attitudes, beliefs, and behavior and ways to reduce both explicit and implicit bias. Her most recent projects examine the use of a perspective-taking online game to address attitudes toward poor people, how racial prejudice shape freedom of speech justifications for racially charged acts, and the influence of system justifying motivations on perceptions of injustice. She is currently a Graduate Policy Fellow at the Institute for Social and Policy Studies at Yale, a Diversity Fellow at the Office for Graduate Student Development and Diversity, and an Intern with the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues’ Representatives to the United Nations. 

Julian Rucker
Dunham 328D
julian.rucker@yale.edu
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Julian Rucker is a first-year doctoral student. He is broadly interested in investigating the psychological factors shaping perceptions of, reactions to and motivations to address intergroup inequality across a number of societal domains (e.g., criminal justice, education, health). For example, one of his main lines of research examines how lay beliefs about the interpersonal or structural nature of racism shape subsequent responses, after exposure to racial disparities in the U.S. Criminal Justice System. Before coming to Yale, Julian received a BA in Psychology, with a minor in Sociology, at The University of Texas at Austin and received a MA in Psychology from Northwestern University.

Lauren K. Ruth
Dunham 328D
lauren.ruth@yale.edu

Lauren is a sixth-year doctoral candidate in Social Psychology. She received her B.S. in Psychology and B.A. in Philosophy from Tulane University in New Orleans. Prior to starting graduate school, she taught high school math. She is broadly interested in the processes that create how we observe gender in others and in ourselves. Her dissertation work examines how interdependence between low-status and high-status groups impacts how the high-status group stereotypes the low-status group.

Aaron Santascoy
Dunham 328B
nicholas.santascoy@yale.edu

Nicholas Santascoy is a fifth-year doctoral student. He received his BA in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. His research emphasizes the catalyzing effect of social cognition (stable beliefs and transient appraisals) on the social psychology of bias. For example, in one line of work, he examines how lay causal beliefs of stereotyping impact people’s total psychological response (cognitive, conative, affective, and behavioral) to their own and others’ bias.

Fabian M. H. Schellhaas
Dunham 328C
fabian.schellhaas@yale.edu
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Fabian is a fourth-year doctoral student. His interest focuses around the psychological processes that impede or facilitate action for social change, which he studies in a variety of cultural and intergroup contexts. His primary research examines why and when inclusive identities and positive relations with high-status groups undermine efforts for social change, and under what conditions members of advantaged groups develop solidarity with the disadvantaged. Prior to coming to Yale, Fabian received a M.Sc. from the University of Oxford, and a B.Sc. from the University of Groningen.

Roseanna Sommers
Dunham 322F
roseanna.sommers@yale.edu
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Roseanna Sommers is in her fourth year of a dual degree program in psychology and law. Her research uses insights from psychology to critique theories of human cognition and behavior embedded in legal doctrines. Before coming to Yale, Roseanna served as a fellow in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She holds a BA in psychology from Swarthmore College.

Liz Tepe Kneeland
Dunham 328E
elizabeth.kneeland@yale.edu
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Liz is a fourth-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program, primarily advised by Jack Dovidio. Before coming to Yale, Liz received her B.A. in Psychology and Political Science from Amherst College. Her research focuses on how implicit beliefs about emotion, specifically whether emotion is malleable or fixed, influence how individuals regulate their emotions in the moment. She has also examined how subtly manipulating these implicit emotion beliefs then influences the strategies individuals use to regulate their negative emotions, and ultimately how successful they are in these efforts. She is also interested in how these emotion beliefs operate within the context of psychiatric disorders that are characterized by emotion dysregulation, such as depression and generalized anxiety disorder. In her research, she utilizes psychophysiology and behavioral tasks. She has also collaborated with Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, Jutta Joormann, and June Gruber.

Andrea C. Vial
Dunham 328C
andrea.vial@yale.edu
Website
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Andrea Vial is a doctoral candidate in social psychology working primarily with Jack Dovidio and Victoria Brescoll (School of Management). She received her BA in psychology with a minor in sociology from Hunter College of the City University of New York. Andrea studies intergroup bias in the workplace, seeking to understand the social and psychological barriers to the advancement of underrepresented (or otherwise low status) groups, with a focus on the experience of leaders from these groups. In particular, she investigates why leaders from low status groups, like women, might be unwilling or unable to promote diversity in their organizations. Andrea received the 2016 American Psychological Association’s Geis Memorial Award to support her doctoral dissertation on gender bias in organizations, and her work has been featured in The Atlantic.

Staff
Lisa Paymer Dodge
lisa.dodge@yale.edu

Lisa Paymer Dodge is a research associate working with Dr. Dovidio since 2007. Her primary responsibilities include online survey construction and implementation using Qualtrics and Amazon Mechanical Turk (mTurk), and administering workshops using these software programs. She also coordinates and manages a department-wide demographic survey and the Intro to Psychology Subject Pool. Her research collaborations include: (1) A Focus on Transition to College for Freshmen, an online study which measured the perspectives of Yale students at the beginning and end of their Freshman year; and (2) Immigration and National Belonging, a multi-disciplinary comprehensive research project funded by the Russell Sage Foundation.